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What Is Drug Addiction?

Substance dependency is a chronic illness that is identified by uncontrollable substance seeking and use, regardless of the harmful effects and alterations in the brain that can be permanent. Some of those who use drugs develop some dangerous behaviours due to these alterations in the functioning of their brain. Drug dependency is a degenerative illness. Relapse is returning to a habit of drug use after a serious attempt to stop using.


The way to drug dependence starts with the wilful act of using drugs. With time, the user is unable to stop voluntarily the need to use the drug. The desire to search for and make use of drugs will now rely on a very huge urge. This is mainly because of the effects of long-term substance exposure on the functioning of the brain. Dependence influences parts of the mind required in reward and inspiration, learning and memory plus control over conduct.

Addiction is a sickness that influences both the mind and conduct.


Is There Treatment For Drug Dependency?

It can, however it is hard. Since dependency is a chronic illness, individuals cannot just quit using the substances for a day or two and be cured of it. Most users require repeated or long-term care to quit using it altogether and get their lives back.


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Enslavement treatment must help the individual to the accompanying

  • desist from drug use
  • remain drug-free
  • achieve more productivity in the society in general and in the family and workplace in particular

Values Of Successful Rehabilitation

According to scientific research conducted since the mid-1970s, the essential principles listed below should be the foundation of all successful treatment programmes

  • Though a complex brain altering illness, drug dependency can be successfully treated.
  • No cure-all treatment plan fits everybody.
  • Easy access to rehab is of utmost importance.
  • The entire needs of the patient, not only drug use issues, should be delivered by a good treatment plan.
  • It's important to remain in treatment long enough.
  • Psychological and other behaviour remedies are used in treating the habit.
  • Behavioural therapies are often combined with medications, which are another important aspect of therapy.
  • To make sure the user's most current requirements are met, there is a need for continuous evaluations and adjustments to the treatment regime.
  • Other possible mental disorders should be considered during treatment.
  • The cleansing administered by medical personnel is the beginning step of the journey.
  • The treatment does not rely on the volition of the patient to yield positive fruits.
  • When in treatment, possible drug use must be constantly monitored.
  • Patients in treatment should be tested for a variety of infectious diseases, such as HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, and tuberculosis and also receive education about how to reduce the risk of getting thee illnesses.

How Is Drug Addiction Treated?

Effective treatment consists of several steps

  • Detoxification (the way a body is cleaned of toxins and drug residue)
  • Behavioural advising
  • medication for addictions to opioids, tobacco, or alcohol
  • assessment and treatment for any co-occurring mental health concerns like anxiety and depression
  • long-term after treatment care to avoid relapse

Using a wide range of treatments tailored to the needs of the patient is a key to success.


Depending on the level of need, mental health services should be added to the medical aspect of any treatment. The follow-up can compromise family- or community-based recovery support systems.


How Is Medication Employed In Substance Dependency Treatment?

The treatment of co-occurring health issues, avoidance of relapse and amelioration of the withdrawal symptoms are some of the cases where medications are needed.

  • Withdrawal The withdrawal symptoms that are witnessed when detox is done could be alleviated with medications. Detoxification is not in itself "treatment," rather just the initial phase all the while. Patients who only go through detoxification and don't have any additional treatment typically relapse back into drug use. The SAMHSA, 2014 study has shown that about 80% of detox programmes use prescription drugs.
  • Relapse Prevention A patient can make use of medication to assist in re-establishing normal brain function and reducing cravings. Alcohol addiction, tobacco (nicotine) and opioid (heroin, prescription pain relievers) have medications for their treatments. Scientists are also currently developing additional medications to treat addiction to marijuana and stimulants, like cocaine and methamphetamines. Treatment for every substance they have ever abused will be necessary for those that use multiple drugs.

What About Behavioural Therapies And Drug Addiction

Patients are assisted by behavioural therapies to

  • change his/her behaviour and attitude related to the substance use
  • Upturn healthy life abilities
  • Endure with different types of treatment, for example, medication

The settings upon which patents can access their treatments and the approaches used varies.

Outpatient behavioural treatment comprises a big range of programmes for patients who go to a behavioural health counsellor regularly. Individual and group therapy, or a combination of both are involved in most treatment programs.


These projects normally offer types of behavioural treatment, for example,

  • Cognitive behavioural therapy used to help the patient identify trigger circumstances where they are most vulnerable to taking the drugs and how to avoid them and move on to overcome the addiction
  • Multidimensional family treatment created for young people with drug abuse issues and their families which addresses a scope of impacts on their drug mishandle designs and is intended to enhance general family working
  • Motivational interviewing, which takes full advantage of the patient's readiness to change and willingness to enter treatment
  • motivational incentives (contingency management), where abstinence from drugs is rewarded and motivated with positive reinforcements

At first, treatment can be as intensive as multiple outpatient sessions every week. regular outpatient treatment that involves fewer meeting hours few days of the week after the intensive treatment in the bid to ensure a sustained healing process.


For people with problems of high severity (plus co-occurring disorders), residential or inpatient programs will have better effects. The around the clock care available at residential rehabilitation centres includes safe boarding facilities and close monitoring of patients. Inpatient treatment facilities can use many therapeutic approaches and are usually working toward assisting the patient after treatment to maintain a drug free, crime free lifestyle.


The following are some examples of residential treatment settings are

  • In the period it takes for the patient to recover, usually six to twelve months, the patient becomes a member of the community at the therapeutic facility. The entire community, comprising treatment employees and patients in recovery, act as essential agents of change, affecting the patient's understanding, attitude, as well as conduct linked with substance use.
  • Shorter-term inpatient treatment that usually concentrates on detoxification and offering initial in-depth counselling and preparation for treatment in community-based environments.
  • Recovery housing, which is normally an aftermath of inpatient or residential treatment, and where patients are given limited term housing under an expert watch. Recuperation housing can help individuals make the move to a free life, for instance, helping them figure out how to manage funds or look for business and also interfacing them to bolster services in the group.

Difficulties Of Re-Passage

Substance abuse alters the functioning of the brain, and several things can activate a craving for the substance within the brain. It is key for patients in treatment, particularly those treated at prison or inpatient facilities, to learn how to identify, steer clear of, and deal with triggers that they are most likely to experience after treatment.